How Does It Affect You?

I really don’t know how to begin this, other than to find a “jumping off point” and hitting the ground running from there.

I read an article online about a “movement” (term used loosely) that a teacher in Indiana is trying to start where another local high school (not the school she teaches at) would have a prom for straight students only.  She wants to have a prom that excludes homosexual students.  Brilliant.

The teacher, Diana Medley, believes that allowing homosexual students to attend the prom is “offensive to us.”  I am not sure who the “us” is, but from the reaction of her local community, it does not include most of the community.  She continues, “I think God puts everyone in our lives for a reason,” but when asked if homosexuals had “any purpose” said, “No, I honestly don’t. Sorry, but I don’t. I don’t understand it.”  And because she referenced the “special needs kids” who she works with at the school where she teaches, it would not be a stretch to say that her bigoted view was that of the school that employs her.

Diana Medley displays a certain type of tolerance, or lack thereof, that people have come to expect from a certain segment of the population.  They do not agree with or understand somebody’s lifestyle or choices, and condemn them.

She held her little “rally” at a local church, Sullivan First Christian Church, but the pastor was quick to distance himself and his church from her little hate movement.  “Our church has no involvement in this whatsoever. It’s a community thing where people have met here,” he told the local TV station.  Another community member went even further and showed that he thinks tolerance and understanding are the keys.  “We shouldn’t be condemning people, and that’s what judgment is.  Christ came to save the people, not to condemn them.  Love them as a person. You don’t have to love what they do, because the gays may not love all the mistakes you make.”  I could not agree more with resident Jim Davis.  If you want to read what tolerance and understanding look like, read the quote from Jim Davis again.

“We shouldn’t be condemning people, and that’s what judgment is.  Christ came to save the people, not to condemn them.  Love them as a person. You don’t have to love what they do, because the gays may not love all the mistakes you make.”  –Jim Davis of Sullivan, Indiana

Love people for who they are.  Interesting concept.  Love them for who they are and not what they do.  Mature thinking.  Love them for who they are and not what they do, because they may not love all of your mistakes, either.  Brilliant.  If more people, both who call themselves religious and those who do not practice any religion, would follow the advice of Jim Davis, there would almost certainly be less hate in the world.  Instead, too many people choose to adopt a “my way or the highway” approach to life, and will ridicule and criticize those who do not fall into lock-step behind them.  To be truly open-minded is to accept that not everyone shares your views or opinions, and to understand that their disagreement does not make them right and you wrong.  Too often, serious issues and debates boil down to that very premise; people will disengage from the conversation when they feel their voice or opinion is not being heard or respected.  In this case, how exactly does the attendance of homosexual students at a prom affect Diana Medley?  Does she even know that homosexuality is not contagious?

Whether the debate is about religion, abortion, homosexuality, politics, sports, or something else, the prudent approach to is enter into the debate with an open mind.  I may wholeheartedly disagree with your position on something, but I take pride in knowing that I approach each discussion with an open mind (even when talking to Florida Gator or New York Yankee fans), even when I suspect the other party is not affording me the same respect.  It is ok to agree to disagree.

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2 Responses to How Does It Affect You?

  1. askthebigot says:

    “We shouldn’t be condemning people, and that’s what judgment is. Christ came to save the people, not to condemn them. Love them as a person. You don’t have to love what they do, because the gays may not love all the mistakes you make.”

    Fantastic. Good precepts for all Christians. Thanks for this great quote.

    • TommyK says:

      Thanks. I think what it boils down to is that too many people use too much time worrying about the lifestyle of everyone else. Focus on the person and nothing else; their politics, beliefs, lifestyle, etc have very little impact on their relationship with us. I have yet to lose sleep over what someone does or believes in their personal time.

      Thank you for your comment.

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